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Gwyneth Paltrow's Company Promotes "Healing Stickers" - NASA Quickly Jumps In To Debunk Them

Gwyneth Paltrow's website, 'GOOP', offers some unusual products in the 'wellness' category. For $175, you can buy an 'Energy Clearing Kit', which consists of some sage, a feather and a little chunk of rock, as well as instructions on how to conduct the cleansing ritual. For $30, you can buy 'Sex Dust'. Yes, seriously. And women can increase their sexual energy for just $66 by purchasing a jade egg that gets inserted into the vagina. Paltrow swears by them.

It's not your everyday pharmacy, that's for sure, but Paltrow's products are supposed to enhance one's health and vitality. They're all natural, after all, and as Paltrow told British Cosmopolitan magazine, "I don't think anything that's natural can be bad for you."

Apparently, she's never heard of things like asbestos, mercury or even poisonous plants.

Paltrow has recently gone too far, however; the website claimed that one of its brands used NASA technology. NASA said to CNN Money, not so much.

The 'Body Vibes' stickers are wearable healthy stickers sold on GOOP. According to the website's pitch, "Human bodies operate at an ideal energetic frequency, but everyday stresses and anxiety can throw off our internal balance, depleting our energy reserves and weakening our immune systems. Body Vibes stickers come pre-programmed to an ideal frequency, allowing them to target imbalances. While you’re wearing them—close to your heart, on your left shoulder or arm—they’ll fill in the deficiencies in your reserves, creating a calming effect, smoothing out both physical tension and anxiety. The founders, both aestheticians, also say they help clear skin by reducing inflammation and boosting cell turnover."

The small, round stickers are $60 for a 10-pack and have cutsie New Age art on them. They are touted as "smart stickers programmed to deliver natural bio-frequencies to optimize brain and body functions, restore missing cell communication, and accelerate the body’s natural ability to heal itself."

Originally, the stickers said they can do this because they're made of conductive carbon material. The same material, GOOP said, that NASA uses to line their space suits so they can keep track of an astronaut's vitals. The stickers, they said, are "pre-programed to an ideal frequency, allowing them to target imbalances."

The GOOP website doesn't say that last part anymore because NASA told the media that they don't use carbon materials to line their spacesuits. Spacesuits, they say, don't have any carbon fibers at all.

"Not only is the whole premise like snake oil, the logic doesn’t even hold up," said Mark Shelhamer, former chief NASA scientist at the human research division, to Gizmodo. "If they promote healing, why do they leave marks on the skin when they are removed?"

After pulling the bit about space-age technology, GOOP threw the Body Vibes company under the bus. "As we have always explained, advice and recommendations included on goop are not formal endorsements and the opinions expressed by the experts and companies we profile do not necessarily represent the views of goop," said a statement from the company.

Body Vibes put out a statement about the product, apologizing for being misleading. "We apologize to NASA, Goop, our customers and our fans for this communication error. We never intended to mislead anyone. We have learned that our engineer was misinformed by a distributor about the material in question, which was purchased for its unique specifications. We regret not doing our due diligence before including the distributor’s information in the story of our product. However, the origins of the material do not anyway impact the efficacy of our product. Body Vibes remains committed to offering a holistic lifestyle tool and we stand by the quality and effectiveness of our product.”

Source: Time, Fox News
Photo: mybodyvibes/Instagram

Paltrow's website, Goop, recently promoted the stickers.

A former NASA scientist was quick to call them bogus.

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